Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Don't Breastfeed Until You Read This

You've probably heard that breast milk is the best milk, right? And while this is true, there is so much more to it than it being the healthiest option. Although to most mothers that's all that matters, but to some others, there are many more factors to consider. Let's start with my breastfeeding background.

I breastfed my firstborn for one year and three months. Then I breastfed my second son for 11 months. I breastfed because:
  • I wanted to give my babies the best nutrition possible,
  • it was convenient for me, as a stay at home Mom,
  • I dislike washing dishes, so adding baby bottles...NO,
  • and formula is expensive.
I stopped breastfeeding my firstborn, because I felt he was old enough, he started exposing me in public when he got cranky, and I simply wanted to stop. On the other hand, I stopped breastfeeding my second son, because I was not producing enough milk.

Things You Should Know About Breastfeeding:
  • The first week is slightly painful, but it gets better.
  • It's easier to do, rather than making a bottle that has to be washed & sterilized after.
  • You might feel a little/ a lot awkward having a hungry baby savagely sucking your breast all the time.
  • You might feel hungry all the time. 
  • You might be one of the blessed few that breastfeeding causes to lose weight.
  • Your child might not get sick for the entire time while you're breastfeeding.(Immune systems varies)
  • Public feedings are tricky at first, but after a while you become a pro, or don't care much about nipple slips.
  • Pervs will watch intensely while you're nursing in hopes that they witness your world's most popular nipples.
  • Your milk supply decreases if you substitute a feeding for formula, without pumping( for several days).
  • Which leads me to, pumping out milk is annoying, but you have to do it to keep your milk production up, and to avoid engorgement.
  • Engorgement is painful, it feels like your breast is about to explode. Don't let it happen. 
  • The first 3 months, you will lose sleep. Also, the only thing your husband can do is wake you at 2 AM with a crying baby that needs to be fed. 
  • The big boobs don't last forever, once you stop breastfeeding, they disappear. (If your breast was small before the baby).
  • Breastfeeding takes away some(if not all) the firmest in your breast, but a good bra fixes that in a geefy.
  • While breastfeeding you might not want your breast involved in sexual activities, unless you're feeling super freaky.
  • Your child might bite your nipples. It hurts so bad, that you might even drop them(on the bed that is).
  • A lot of your friends/family members will see your breast sooner or later.
  • You will taste your breast milk and realize it's fresh like eggs, but pleasantly sweet.
  • You will feel super accomplished if you breastfeed for more than 1 week, imagine how you'll feel after one year.
  • Don't feel bad about not breastfeeding, if you tried your best, ignore the rest.
  • Don't allow people to determine when you should stop breastfeeding.
  • Don't allow people  to encourage you to give your baby formula, if you feel that you're producing enough, and your baby seems satisfied.
Overall, I had an excellent breastfeeding experience, and I would highly recommend that most women do it, for as long as they can.You will be overwhelmed at times, you won't feel like doing it at other times, but if you stick with it, eventually you will get the hang of it.

Sometimes life happens and you're unable to breastfeed your baby, don't beat yourself up about it. Breastfeeding is not for everyone. You can still bond with your baby while bottle feeding, and your child will still grow, and be healthy in Jesus name. I hope this helps in one way or another.

Now it's your turn to open up, just a little.
What are some of your breastfeeding concerns?

If you have breastfed, what was your experience like?

Let's have a heart to heart in the comments below.

Peace and Love.




8 comments:

  1. Hey
    Your blog is awesome. I don't have any kids as yet but I hope to have a few soon, when I find Mr. Right. But whenever that happens I definetly plan to breastfeed. Thanks for the complete honesty about the subject, you made sure to inform the readers that breastfeeding is not all flowers and roses, but well worth the effort. I would like to read about your experience as a mother of two, and how you adjusted. That should be interesting also. Thanks as always for another great read.

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    1. Thanks Kitty! I'm glad you enjoy my blog, makes me feel mushy inside...lol. Thanks for commenting also...I'm always grateful when people take the time out of their busy schedules to comment. You're super!

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  2. Most of my concerns were answered. You make me feel better about my decision to breastfeed(if I'm able to). Just one question, were you or did you nurse your baby right after giving birth or do you formula feed?

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    1. Hi Anonymous
      I'm glad I was helpful and pray that you are able to breastfeed. To answer your question, you Do have the option to nurse after giving birth, However I did not Due to having a csection. Once I was up and able I nursed my baby's belly full. So in the very beginning, I did formula feed for a few feedings(1 day). thanks for asking and I hope this helps.

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  3. Just a tip...
    I had to have a tubal ligation after delivery of my second child. I did not know, nor did the nurses advise me that my milk would likely not come in. So after nursing and then having to suppliment with formula and working very hard for 3 months I had to give up. Hope that info is helpful.

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    1. Hi Anonymous #2
      This information is very useful! I've researched tubal ligation side effects, but never knew it affected your ability to nurse. I'm sorry that you weren't able to, and wasn't even properly advised to avoid that frustration. Thanks for sharing this information!

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  4. Tubal ligation does not prevent milk from coming in.

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    1. I'm no Doctor, but I'm guessing different bodies react differently. And in Anonymous #2 situation, she was unable to nurse, due to it, or a combination of other factors and a tubal ligation. Who knows...either way, no tubal ligation for me. :) Thanks for stopping by.

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